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EU to Ban Medicinal Herbs from April 2011

Thanks to legislation that was first put in place six years ago, virtually all herbal medications and supplements will become illegal in the EU as of April, 2011.

Freedom of choice in medicine is being taken away. You and your loved ones will only have access to the treatments based on Pharmaceutical Drugs. No traditional remedies, no Chinese herbs, no Ayurvedic herbs, no medicinal herbs whatsoever. Chinese medicine practitioners will lose access to the majority of the herbs and medicines on which they rely. Consumers will NOT be able to buy any Chinese herbal products

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Comments

  1. This is another case of pharmaceutical companies giving legislators back-handers. I’m disgusted and will lobby against this, while I’m protesting about the fascist state we live in.

  2. nelson brunton says:

    I am a firm believer that this Ban on Herb and Health supplements should be regarded as a infringement of Human Rights. People Power is now needed more than ever before.

  3. This is so sad. The australian government is currently trying to ban common garden plants that they consider precursors to ‘drugs’. This is another version of the same thing… all over the world big pharma via governments are trying to further erode our human rights to live in harmony with our natural, health giving world.

  4. It “appears” EU is seeking big pharm profits…. why outlaw something that works? If you want to play by FDA rules, be prepared for many lawsuits. I’m tired of BAD medicine as approved by the FDA, knowing full well they were not safe when released… yet the FDA released then anyhow. I had the utmost respect for the Eu. Union, however this definitely changes things.

  5. AntiSocialist says:

    The International Socialists have won. The people are doomed. Banning common healthy foods is next.

  6. J.Mabelis says:

    I think the article is grossly misleading. The purpose of this piece of legislation is simply consumer protection – the kind European citizens have come to expect from their governments for almost a century. It was stimulated by founds of toxical chemicals (byproducts) in “herbal medicines” and the increasing tendency to put in pills and waters all kinds of stuff except the ones indicated on the packaging. Also, it purports to protect against unproven health claims.
    The idea was simply a piece of quality control – and as such the principle of these guidelines was widely acclaimed, not least by the bona-fide producers of herbal products and food supplements.
    To effectively control the quality and pureness of herbal products, they evidently have to be registered. The period for registration of existing products ends april 30, 2011, and that is what all the fuzz is about.

    The article claims many things which are, in my opinion, very misleading:
    First, it states: “This legislation established a new set of rules and regulations for the use of herbal products that have been freely traded for hundreds of years.” That is simply not true: there are NO products which “have been freely traded for hundreds of years”. Sure, there are herbs which have been traded for hundreds of years – but it is, mostly, not these herbs themselves which the new law targets, but unregistered and uncontrolled bottles of pills which CLAIM to contain these herbs. One of the important advantages of the new laws is that the consumer can be sure the pills indeed DO contain what it says on the package. And that they do NOT contain toxic stuff – which is, of course, NOT mentioned on the package. (A number of Ayurvedic medicinal products were found to contain dangerous levels of highly toxic metals, for instance.) Also, it targets misleading information on the package and outright dangerous advice on dosage.
    The outcry “No traditional remedies, no Chinese herbs” is far from the truth, as is the claim “Consumers will NOT be able to buy any Chinese herbal products within the EU.” To date, a few hundred products have been approved, and together they comprise the vast majority of “traditionally used herbs”.
    The claim that “This directive requires that all herbal preparations must be put through the same kind of procedure as pharmaceuticals.” is ludicrous, as can be readily inferred from the text itself, where it says that getting a product approved will cost you 80,000 – 120,000. This is a far cry from the tens of millions required to get a new medicinal drug approved. Although this cost is, in my opinion, too high, it is nevertheless not beyond the means of a small company. In fact, the small UK manufacturer “Bio-Health” (a 15-person company) said, last february, that there is “absolutely no excuse” for other companies not to have their products registered. They are, in fact, quite positive about these new laws as it will help the public to discern between bona-fide producers with good quality control and bunglers selling sugar pills (or worse!) as “dietary supplements”.

    Finally, I don’t know what to make of the claim that “There is not any evidence to prove that herbal medicine present a significant risk to the public under previous and present legislation, when policed properly.” There are, in fact, numerous examples of “medicinal herb” products containing toxins or not at all containing what is written on the package or carrying dangerous advice. Numerous exmples of people getting ill or dying as a consequence. So, maybe, these products were not “policed properly”? I can only interprete it as a cheap play on anti-EU feelings. Whatever the merits of the UK control system, IF you want to take part in a free EU market, it is obvious that guidelines like this have to be in accordance among the EU countries.

    Having said all this, it is true that there has been a lot of criticism on the EU guidelines of 2002 and, in my opinion, not without reason. The guidelines do indeed seem to favor Big Pharma (albeit not in the sense presented in the article; remember that Big Pharma is, to date, the MAIN producer of the kind of herbal medicines which are the target of the new guidelines – a multi-billion dollar business. Yet, the fear that these guidelines may help them drive small companies out of business seems, in my opinion, justified.) The guidelines also do seem to discriminate against non-western medicine in an unreasonable way.

    The “petition” the article links to (which is, tellingly, very hard to find) consists of just a few sentences and seems to me totally unhelpful.
    As it stands, I am glad with the quality control the new laws provide, despite their obvious shortcomings.
    Meanwhile, I would like to plead for fervent support for those trying to get the rules for getting a product registered more fair in the above mentioned respects.

    • AntiSocialist says:

      “It’s all about protecting the people” Really? It is in their inherent nature that prescription drugs kill hundreds of thousands of people worldwide annually. Death is a natural, government approved side effect of prescription drugs and nothing is being done about “protecting the people” from these insanely dangerous drugs. Herbs have been used for tens of thousands of years and now suddenly personal choices are to be taken away from the people. In a free market society, quality and effectiveness always wins, self-regulates and self-educates.

    • Live and let live!!!
      Let everybody decide for themselves!
      This ban is an infringement of human rights.

  7. antonio brandao says:

    Whoever wants to act against this can at least sign this petition

    https://secure.avaaz.org/en/eu_herbal_medicine_ban/?rc=fb&pv=0

  8. Don’t the fools realize the insanity of banning the sale of naturally occurring food supplements? Their argument that “they’re unregulated, therefore dangerous” is ridiculous. At least they’re out in the open and subject to peer review and the court of public testing. Makig them illegal just drives them underground where anyone seeking to make a few bucks can fill a gelcap with sugar and talcum powder and call it whatever they want. Make no mistake, this is all about rewarding big pharma for campaign contributions. It has NOTHING to do with the well-being of the public.

Trackbacks

  1. […] light of the upcoming EU Ban on Medicinal Herbs, I’ve decided to stock up on my Ayurvedic and Chinese herbal remedies. After spending the […]

  2. […] medicine when it comes to preventing and treating a wide range of common maladies, then the EU Ban on Medicinal Herbs will affect you and your freedom of medical choice […]

  3. Sergey says:

    I will gladly sign all the petitions related to this basic rights violation. Can’t believe we live in a world where this is even possible.

  4. Libby says:

    Well, I am not surprised. Ever since EU came about, it has been known to follow dumb American laws. They don’t care about the people, or our health, they only want the money. Isn’t it obvious?

  5. Quincy says:

    This is outrageous. Have the politicians lost their common sense? I’m signing all the petitions!

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